Caplan-bensley Foundation Dog Food initiative

The Caplan-Bensley Foundation​

Background

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The Caplan-Bensley Foundation (CBF) is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 2007 by David Reid Caplan and Maria Bensley Caplan.  The CBF is a family focused, non-profit organization that believes at-risk people along with their vulnerable animals are all members of a family who deserve a safe and comfortable place in society.

Our critical mission is to make society stronger through the elimination of wasteful practice and by promoting the awareness that every resource and every life, both human and animal, is treasured and must be preserved. 

CBF supports and promotes the human-animal relationship by "Saving Both Ends of the Leash" thus improving the physical, social and emotional health of people and society.

Numerous pet dogs, are companions to children, elderly, veterans, those living alone, and those suffering physically or emotionally.  For many alone or at-risk individuals, their pet-dog is the only reason to go on living.  Keeping dogs out of shelters not only saves the life of the dog, but also brings huge relief to owners who can now keep their beloved companion by their side, and continue to receive the great benefits of that bond.
 

The bond between people and pets is a mutually beneficial relationship.  The positive impact of human-animal interactions on individual and community health is well documented. Research has proven the many tangible benefits that exist when animals are present in people’s lives.

For example, pet ownership lowers blood pressure in response to mental stress[1], pet owners have higher one-year survival rates after heart attacks[2], and ownership of pets, particularly dogs, may reduce cardio-vascular risk factors[3].

In addition, further findings show that pet ownership contributes to a decreased frequency in otherwise unnecessary doctor’s visits[4] resulting in huge savings on public health expenditures directly benefiting pet-owners and society as a whole.


[1] Allen, K., Shykoff, B. E., & Joseph L. Izzo, J. (2001). Pet ownership, but not ACE inhibitor therapy, blunts home blood pressure responses to mental stress. Hypertension, 38, 815-820.

[2] Friedmann, E., Katcher, A. H., Lynch, J. J., & Thomas, S. A. (1980). Animal companions and one-year survival of patients after discharge from a coronary care unit. Public Health Reports, 95(4), 307-312.

[3] Levine, G.N.; Allen, K.; Braun, L.T.; Christian, H.E.; Friedmann, E.;Taubert, K.A.; Thomas, S.A.; Wells, D.L.; Lange, R.A. Pet ownership and cardiovascular risk: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation 2013, 127, 2353–2363.

[4] Heady, B.; Grabka, M.; Kelley, J.; Reddy, P.; Tseng, Y.-P. Pet ownership is good for your health and saves public expenditure. Australian and German longitudinal evidence. Aust. Soc. Monit. 2002, 5, 93–99